Archive | racial bias

13 March 2014 ~ Comments Off

Scheduled Executions of Ray Jasper and Anthony Doyle Highlight Arbitrariness of the Death Penalty

Ray Jasper and Anthony Doyle, both African American, are scheduled to be executed in the next two weeks for murders they committed as 18-year-old youths.  Their cases exemplify the arbitrariness of the death penalty, as the U.S. Supreme Court has banned this punishment for juvenile offenders under the age of 18.

Ray Jasper is scheduled to be executed by the State of Texas on Wednesday, March 19 for the 1998 robbery and murder of recording studio owner David Alejandro in San Antonio. His two co-defendants (both age 19 at the time of the crime) avoided the death penalty and received sentences of life in prison. If Jasper had been three months younger, he would not be facing execution.

According to an Urgent Action issued by Amnesty International, another concern in this case is the fact that the jury failed to include a single African American juror; prosecutors dismissed the two African Americans in the jury pool.  All 17 inmates still on death row from Bexar County are people of color.

Read more about Jasper’s case from Amnesty International.

You can also read a letter to Gawker from David Alejandro’s brother, Steven Alejandro, and an article in the San Antonio Express-News about other members of the Alejandro family, including the parents of David Alejandro (“Family prepares for execution of son’s killer,” March 15, 2014).

Anthony Doyle is scheduled for execution on Thursday, March 27 for the murder of 37-year-old Hyun Mi Cho in January 2003.  He was 93 days past his 18th birthday at the time of the crime. The victim was delivering food to Doyle’s family home in Rowlett (Dallas County) when he demanded money from her and then hit her with a baseball bat. He then hid her body and stole her phone, credit cards, and car.

According to an Urgent Action issued by Amnesty International, Doyle told police that he had intended to rob the delivery person so that he could support his three-week-old daughter. Psychologists testified at trial that Doyle had been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and “was not physiologically or neurologically mature enough to inhibit emotions, restrain impulsive acts or consider options.” Similar to Jasper, if he had been just a few months younger he would not be facing execution.

Read more about Doyle’s case from Amnesty International.

In 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Roper v. Simmons that it is unconstitutional to impose the death penalty on offenders below the age of 18 due to that age group’s impulsiveness, poor judgment, peer pressure, and underdeveloped sense of responsibility. While the court ruled that a line had to be drawn somewhere, it noted that the “qualities that distinguish juveniles from adults do not disappear when an individual turns 18.”  The cases of Ray Jasper and Anthony Doyle clearly exhibit the same reasons as those given by the Court as to why teenagers should not be sentenced to death.

Take Action Today
Please write or call Governor Rick Perry and the Clemency Section of the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles to ask for clemency for these two men.

  • Stress their youth at the time of their crime and the ability of young people to change and mature.
  • Include the specific facts of each case that should weigh heavily on the decision to grant clemency, such as racial discrimination in the jury selection process in Ray Jasper’s case and the scientific evidence regarding Anthony Doyle’s diminished mental faculties.
  • Remember to respectfully acknowledge the seriousness of their respective crimes.

You can take action on Jasper’s case directly through the website of Amnesty International USA.

Contact Information for Governor Perry and the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles
For appeals for Ray Jasper, please cite inmate number 999-341.

For appeals for Anthony Doyle, please cite inmate number 999-478.

Governor Rick Perry
Office of the Governor
P.O. Box 12428
Austin, Texas 78711-2428
Information and Referral Hotline: (800) 843-5789 [for Texas callers]
Citizen’s Opinion Hotline: (800) 252-9600 [for Texas callers]
Information and Referral and Opinion Hotline: (512) 463-1782 [for Austin, Texas and out-of-state callers]
Online Contact: http://www2.governor.state.tx.us/contact

Board of Pardons and Paroles
Clemency Section
General Counsel’s Office
8610 Shoal Creek Boulevard
Austin, Texas 78758
Phone (512) 406-5852, Fax (512) 467-0945
Email: bpp-pio@tdcj.state.tx.us

 

 

 

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20 November 2013 ~ Comments Off

Texas Court of Criminal Appeals Dismisses Duane Buck Petition

Today, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals denied Duane Buck’s appeal for a new, fair sentencing hearing free from racial bias. With today’s decision, Texas has once again reneged on the clear and unequivocal promise made by former Texas Attorney General (now U.S. Senator) John Cornyn that Mr. Buck would not face execution based on a racially biased death sentence. Despite this promise, Mr. Buck is now at grave risk of execution in Texas.  Read the statement from his attorneys below.

Buckfinal-01The ongoing Duane Buck case is an egregious example of racial bias in the criminal justice system. In 1997, at Mr. Buck’s capital sentencing hearing for the murders of Debra Gardner and Kenneth Butler in Harris County, Texas, the trial prosecutor elicited testimony from a psychologist that Mr. Buck posed a future danger because he’s black. The prosecutor then relied on this testimony in arguing in favor of the death penalty, and the jury sentenced him to death.

At first, there was hope Texas would rectify this mistake. Three years after Duane Buck was sentenced to death, then-Texas Attorney General (now U.S. Senator) John Cornyn identified seven cases in which Texas relied on testimony linking race to future dangerousness, including Mr. Buck’s. Recognizing the error, Cornyn promised not to oppose new sentencing hearings for these seven defendants, and Texas upheld this promise in all of the cases — except for Duane Buck’s.

Now, given another chance to remedy the situation, the Texas Criminal Court of Appeals has dropped the ball again, denying Duane Buck’s appeal for a new sentencing hearing. With today’s ruling, the Harris County District Attorney’s office could seek an execution date any time, and Duane Buck’s life is at stake once more.

As might be expected, this shocking case — and its most recent development — have provoked a large outcry in Texas and across the nation, from the civil rights community, faith leaders, elected officials, former prosecutors and judges, and numerous other prominent individuals. Even one of Mr. Buck’s trial prosecutors and the surviving victim in the case have called for a new, fair sentencing hearing.

Take Action Today!

If you have not done so already, please join more than 50,000 Texans and concerned citizens nationwide and across the world in signing a petition by one of Mr. Buck’s trial prosecutors, Linda Geffen, which urges the Harris County District Attorney’s Office to agree to a new sentencing hearing and, with this latest development, to not set an execution date.

Mr. Buck’s life was spared by the U.S. Supreme Court before his September 2011 scheduled execution. Two U.S. Supreme Court justices agreed that Mr. Buck’s death sentence requires review because “our criminal justice system should not tolerate” a death sentence “marred by racial overtones.”  In today’s ruling by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, three of the nine appeals court judges joined in a dissent, as noted in the statement from attorneys below.

For more information about Mr. Buck’s case, please go to: http://www.naacpldf.org/case-issue/duane-buck-sentenced-death-because-he-black

Watch a powerful, 10-minute video about Mr. Buck’s story, “A Broken Promise in Texas: Race, the Death Penalty and the Duane Buck Case” here: http://youtu.be/tD6WWN38ZGc

Statement from Attorneys for Duane Buck in Response to Today’s Ruling by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals

“We are gravely disappointed that the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals has dismissed Duane Buck’s appeal and failed to recognize that his death sentence is the unconstitutional product of racial discrimination. As noted by three members of the Court, ‘[t]he record in this case reveals a chronicle of inadequate representation at every stage of the proceedings, the integrity of which is further called into question by the admission of racist and inflammatory testimony from an expert witness at the punishment stage.’  These judges recognized that this outcome ‘jeopardizes both the integrity of the underlying conviction and of this Court’s judicial processes’ and deprives Mr. Buck of ‘one full and fair opportunity to present his claims.’

“With today’s decision, Texas has once again reneged on its promise to ensure that Mr. Buck would not be executed pursuant to a death sentence that was the unfair product of a prosecutorial appeal to racial bias and stereotype. ,For this reason, more than one hundred civil rights leaders, clergy of various faiths, former judges, former prosecutors, and thousands of individuals in Texas and across the world, have joined our call for a new, fair, and colorblind sentencing for Duane Buck. We now urge the Harris County District Attorney’s Office to respect these calls and refrain from seeking an execution date for Mr. Buck. We will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the important due process and equal protection issues at stake in Mr. Buck’s case, and we are hopeful that the Supreme Court will intervene to right this unequivocal wrong.”

- Attorney Kate Black, Christina Swarns, Director of the Criminal Justice Practice at NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund, and Kathryn Kase, Executive Director of Texas Defender Service

November 20, 2013

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21 June 2013 ~ Comments Off

Case Updates: Kimberly McCarthy, Rigoberto Avila, and Duane Buck

It’s been an eventful week for Texas death penalty cases.  On Tuesday, June 20, Kimberly McCarthy’s attorney filed an appeal to the Dallas trial court and the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in an attempt to stop her execution, which is scheduled to occur next Wednesday, June 26.  If it proceeds, it will be the 500th execution in Texas since 1982.

The appeal argues that the jury selection process in her 2002 capital trial was tainted by racial discrimination and that she received ineffective legal representation both during her trial and in earlier stages of her appeals.

McCarthy, an African American woman, was sentenced to death in Dallas County for the 1997 murder of Dorothy Booth, a white woman, by a jury that was all white but for one person. Dallas County is notorious for its longstanding practice of excluding African Americans from criminal juries.  In Ms. McCarthy’s 2002 capital trial, the state employed this practice to exclude three of only four non-white potential jurors.

Read more in the Houston Chronicle, the Austin Chronicle, and the Guardian. (Links courtesy of Steve Hall at StandDown Texas.)

Earlier posts on the case of Kimberly McCarthy are available here.

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In El Paso, a state district judge granted a motion to withdraw the July 10 execution date of Rigoberto Avila, Jr., in order to give his attorneys more time to litigate new scientific evidence relevant to the merits of his case.

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Finally, last night, June 20, 2013,  Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN aired a segment on the case of Duane Buck. Watch the first half of the segment at:

http://ac360.blogs.cnn.com/2013/06/20/inmate-on-death-row-because-hes-black/?hpt=ac_t1

 
Watch the second half, including an interview with Legal Analyst Jeffrey Toobin, at:
A rough transcript of both segments is available here.
 
Sign the Change.org petition calling for a new sentencing hearing for Duane Buck!

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10 June 2013 ~ Comments Off

Must-see powerful new video: “A Broken Promise in Texas: Race, the Death Penalty and the Duane Buck Case”

Racial bias has no place in the administration of justice – tell that to Harris County, Texas. Duane Buck, sentenced to death in Harris County in 1997, may soon be at risk of execution despite the fact that his death sentence is the clear product of racial discrimination.

A powerful new video — narrated by former Texas Governor Mark White and featuring interviews with Texas civil rights leaders, legislators, the surviving victim in Mr. Buck’s case, one of the trial prosecutors, and Mr. Buck’s family members — exposes the outrageous discrimination in Mr. Buck’s case. Watch “A Broken Promise in Texas: Race, the Death Penalty and the Duane Buck Case” today and share it with your social media networks.

As the video shows, at Mr. Buck’s 1997 capital sentencing hearing in Harris County, the trial prosecutor elicited testimony from a psychologist that Mr. Buck posed a future danger because he is black. The prosecutor relied on this testimony in arguing in favor of a death sentence. The jury then found Mr. Buck would be a future danger and sentenced him to death.

Three years later, then-Texas Attorney General (now U.S. Senator) John Cornyn identified seven cases in which Texas improperly relied on testimony linking race to future dangerousness, including Mr. Buck’s. The Attorney General promised not to oppose new sentencing hearings for these seven defendants. Texas upheld this promise in all of the cases – except for Mr. Buck’s.

It is high time for Texas to keep its promise and ensure that Mr. Buck receives the fair, colorblind sentencing that all defendants deserve.

Mr. Buck’s shocking case has prompted outcry from the civil rights community, faith leaders, elected officials, and many other prominent individuals in Texas and across the country. Even one of Mr. Buck’s trial prosecutors and the surviving victim in the case support a new, fair sentencing hearing.

More than 50,000 people from Texas and nationwide have also joined the chorus of support by signing an online petition urging the Harris County District Attorney’s Office not to seek an execution date for Mr. Buck. Sign the petition today and share it with your social networks!

Additional background information is available here.

A new sentencing hearing for Mr. Buck is critically important to the integrity of our entire justice system. We must not tolerate sending a man to his death based on the color of his skin.

Tell Texas to uphold the promise made by former Attorney General John Cornyn and grant Duane Buck a sentencing hearing free of the stain of racial bias.  Sign the Change.org petition and help us spread the word about this egregious case.

 

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17 April 2013 ~ Comments Off

Texas House Committee Considers Racial Justice Act

On April 16, 2013, the Texas House Criminal Jurisprudence Committee considered House Bill 2458, which seeks to prohibit the imposition of a death sentence or execution under any judgment that was sought or obtained on the basis of race.  TCADP Executive Director Kristin Houlé testified in support of the bill in front of the committee, as did Yannis Banks, Legislative Liaison for the Texas NAACP and Cindy Eigler, Policy Specialist for the Texas Interfaith Center for Public Policy.  Former Texas Governor Mark White and Linda Geffin, one of the trial prosecutors in the 1997 Harris County case of Duane Buck, provided written testimony in support of the bill, as well.

Several groups registered support for the bill, including the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers’ Association, the Texas Criminal Justice Coalition, Texas Fair Defense Project, the ACLU of Texas, Texas Defender Service, and the Texas Catholic Conference.  HB 2458 was left pending in the committee.

Read coverage of the committee hearing by the Associated Press and the Texas Tribune.

Pasted below is a press release about the hearing from Mr. Buck’s legal team.

For Immediate Release: April 16, 2013
Contact: Laura Burstein, 202-626-6868 (o); 202-669-3411(c); Laura.Burstein@squiresanders.com

 

Former Governor, Former Prosecutor, Civil Rights Leaders, and Other Prominent Individuals Offer Testimony in Favor of Texas Racial Justice Act 

 

Testimony: Duane Buck’s Case, Whose Sentencing Hearing Was Poisoned With Racial Discrimination, Shows That Texas Needs The Racial Justice Act

 

(Austin, TexasApril 16, 2013) Several prominent Texans submitted testimony to the House of Representatives Criminal Jurisprudence Committee today in support of the Racial Justice Act, which seeks to prohibit the imposition of a death sentence or execution under any judgment that was sought or obtained on the basis of race.  The Harris County, Texas, death penalty case of Duane Buck was cited as a clear example of how racial discrimination corrupts Texas’ death penalty system. Mr. Buck, an African American man, was condemned to death in 1997 after his sentencing jury was told that he posed a future danger because he is Black.

 

The Criminal Jurisprudence Committee is hearing testimony today on House Bill 2458, Texas Racial Justice Act, sponsored by Representative Senfronia Thompson, who represents District 141, which includes part of Harris County.

Those offering testimony in favor of the Racial Justice Act include: Mark White, Texas Governor (1983-1987); Linda Geffin, former Harris County Assistant District Attorney who served as a prosecutor in Mr. Buck’s case; and Yannis Banks, Texas NAACP Legislative Liaison.

 

“The way we determine punishment in the United States is with a fair trial and sentencing. Duane Buck did not receive that. His case, and other cases, shows how racial discrimination can infect Texas’ courtrooms. We cannot condone any form of racial discrimination in our criminal justice system and we must act to end it,” said Governor White in testimony submitted to the Committee. Governor White and more than 100 civil rights leaders, clergy, elected officials, past ABA Presidents and former judges and prosecutors delivered a letter to Harris County District Attorney Mike Anderson urging a new, fair sentencing hearing for Mr. Buck.

 

At Mr. Buck’s capital sentencing hearing in 1997, the prosecutor elicited testimony from a psychologist that Mr. Buck posed a future danger to society because he is black. The prosecutor relied on this testimony in arguing in favor of a death sentence. The jury accepted the prosecutor’s argument, determined that Mr. Buck was a future danger, and sentenced him to death. Three years later, then-Texas Attorney General (now U.S. Senator) John Cornyn acknowledgedthat reliance on testimony connecting race to dangerousness was wholly unacceptable. Attorney General Cornyn promised that his office would seek new, fair sentencing hearings for six people, including Mr. Buck, whose cases were tainted by such testimony. The State kept its word in every case – except for Mr. Buck’s.

 

“I offer my support of this legislative effort, because I believe that Texas cannot, and should not, allow considerations of race to taint the criminal justice process, particularly where the ultimate punishment is at stake,” said former Harris County Assistant District Attorney Linda Geffin, one of Mr. Buck’s trial prosecutors, in her testimony. Ms. Geffin started an online petition in support of a new, fair sentencing hearing for Mr. Buck, which has garnered more than 30,000 signatures from concerned Texans and people across the country and grows each day.

 

New research by University of Maryland Professor Ray Paternoster shows that at the time of Mr. Buck’s trial, the Harris County District Attorney’s Office was three times more likely to seek the death penalty against African-American defendants like Mr. Buck and Harris County juries were twice as likely to sentence African-American defendants like Mr. Buck to death. This important new study was cited in Mr. Buck’s appeal, which is currently pending before the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals.

 

“Mounting research evidence, particularly from Harris County, Texas, suggests that race has played a substantial role in decisions regarding whether a case advances to a death trial and whether a death sentence is imposed,” University of Texas Professor David Kirk stated in expert testimony submitted to the Committee that did not take a position for or against the Racial Justice Act. “Dr. Paternoster’s research conforms to highly rigorous standards for statistical analyses. His conclusion – that there is strong evidence of Black-White disparities in the advancement of cases to a death trial as well as the imposition of a death sentence – is the logical, and profoundly disturbing, conclusion to be drawn from the weight of the available data.”

 

“Duane Buck’s case shows that Texas desperately needs the Racial Justice Act. His sentencing hearing was poisoned with racial discrimination and he must be given a new, fair hearing. Until the government starts treating everyone fairly and equally, no one in Texas can have confidence in the criminal justice system,” said Yannis Banks, Texas NAACP Legislative Liaison, who plans to testify in front of the Committee.

 

Mr. Buck was convicted of capital murder in Harris County for the shooting deaths of Debra Gardner and Kenneth Butler. A third person, Phyllis Taylor, was shot but survived her wound. She has forgiven Mr. Buck and does not wish to see him executed.

 

Mr. Buck’s life was spared by the U.S. Supreme Court before his scheduled execution in September 2011. Although two U.S. Supreme Court justices agreed that Mr. Buck’s death sentence required review because “our criminal justice system should not tolerate” a death sentence “marred by racial overtones,” the case is now in the hands of Texas officials.

 

Mr. Buck’s exemplary behavior while in prison demonstrates the falsity of the racially biased future dangerousness evidence used in his case: In his fifteen years on death row he has not had a single disciplinary write-up.

 

For more information about Mr. Buck’s case, please go to: http://www.naacpldf.org/case-issue/duane-buck-sentenced-death-because-he-black

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To speak with Mr. Buck’s attorneys, prominent individuals testifying in favor of the Racial Justice Act, or other experts, please contact Laura Burstein at 202-626-6868 (o); 202-669-3411(c); or Laura.Burstein@squiresanders.com

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29 March 2013 ~ Comments Off

Dallas County District Attorney Agrees to Another Delay in Execution of Kimberly McCarthy

*Update* Judge Mitchell has ordered a modification of McCarthy’s execution date to June 26, 2013. Read more from the Dallas Morning News.

On March 29, 2013, Dallas County District Attorney Craig Watkins asked State District Judge Larry Mitchell to modify the execution date of Kimberly McCarthy.  McCarthy had been scheduled to be executed next week on April 3, 2013 for the 1997 murder of Dorothy Booth in Dallas County.  According to the Dallas Morning News (“Dallas County DA Craig Watkins asks judge to temporarily delay woman’s execution while bills pending before legislature,” March 29, 2013), Watkins asked “for the delay to await whether the Texas legislature passes six bills that could impact the application of the death penalty in Texas,” including legislation aimed at addressing claims that racial bias might have been a factor in the decision to seek or impose a sentence of death.

Earlier this year, Judge Mitchell halted and rescheduled a January 29, 2013 execution date for Kimberly McCarthy in order to give her attorneys more time to pursue an appeal based on racial discrimination in the jury selection process.  According to attorney Maurie Levin, of the twelve jurors seated at trial, all were white, except one, and eligible non-white jurors were excluded from serving by the State.

A motion to move the execution date is still pending before the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals.  According to the Dallas Morning News, “Mitchell said at the hearing that if the appellate court had not ruled by the end of the day Monday, he would issue and order moving the execution date” to June 26, 2013.

Read more from the Dallas Morning News.  Read earlier posts about Kimberly McCarthy here and here.

 

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20 March 2013 ~ Comments Off

More than 100 Prominent Leaders Call for New Sentencing Hearing for Duane Buck

Today, over 100 prominent individuals from Texas and throughout the country, including civil rights leaders, elected officials, former prosecutors and judges, past and present ABA presidents, and clergy representing seven faith denominations, released a statement urging the Harris County District Attorney to provide a new, fair sentencing hearing for Texas death row inmate Duane Buck. Former Texas Governor Mark White, one of the signatories, delivered the statement to the Harris County District Attorney’s Office in Houston this morning.  Read the Statement of Support and view the full list of 102 signatories.

In 1997, Mr. Buck was convicted of fatally shooting Debra Gardner and Kenneth Butler. During his sentencing hearing, the prosecutor elicited testimony from Dr. Walter Quijano before the jury in which he indicated that African Americans, like Mr. Buck, are more likely to commit future acts of violence. Under Texas’ death penalty statute, prosecutors must demonstrate a defendant’s “future dangerousness” and juries may impose a death sentence only if they find that the defendant poses such a future danger. In her closing argument at Mr. Buck’s sentencing, the prosecutor urged the jury to impose a death sentence and, in doing so, relied on Dr. Quijano’s testimony that Mr. Buck would be dangerous in the future. The jury followed the prosecutor’s recommendation:  it found that Mr. Buck posed a future danger and sentenced him to death.

Mr. Buck’s life was spared by the U.S. Supreme Court before his scheduled execution in September 2011. Although two U.S. Supreme Court justices agreed that Mr. Buck’s death sentence required review because “our criminal justice system should not tolerate” a death sentence “marred by racial overtones,” the case is now back in the hands of state officials.

Read today’s press release and learn more about the case of Duane Buck.

Join more than 100 local, state, and national leaders in calling for a new sentencing hearing for Duane Buck!

Another signatory to the statement, former Harris County District Attorney Linda Geffin, one of Mr. Buck’s trial prosecutors, today started an online petition on Change.org in support of a new, fair sentencing hearing for Mr. Buck.  Sign the petition now!

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13 March 2013 ~ Comments Off

New Study Finds Significant Racial Bias in Harris County’s Death Penalty System

New research released today in an appeal filed by Texas death row inmate Duane Buck shows that at the time of Mr. Buck’s case, the Harris County District Attorney’s Office was over three times more likely to seek the death penalty against African American defendants like Mr. Buck.  The research also shows that Harris County juries were more than twice as likely to impose death sentences on African American defendants in cases like Mr. Buck’s.

In 1997, Mr. Buck was convicted of fatally shooting Debra Gardner and Kenneth Butler. During his sentencing hearing, the prosecutor elicited testimony from Dr. Walter Quijano before the jury in which he indicated that African Americans, like Mr. Buck, are more likely to commit future acts of violence. Under Texas’ death penalty statute, prosecutors must demonstrate a defendant’s “future dangerousness” and juries may impose a death sentence only if they find that the defendant poses such a future danger. In her closing argument at Mr. Buck’s sentencing, the prosecutor urged the jury to impose a death sentence and, in doing so, relied on Dr. Quijano’s testimony that Mr. Buck would be dangerous in the future.[1] The jury followed the prosecutor’s recommendation:  it found that Mr. Buck posed a future danger and sentenced him to death.

Three years after Mr. Buck’s capital trial, then-Texas Attorney General (now U.S. Senator) John Cornyn identified seven cases in which the State of Texas impermissibly relied on Dr. Quijano’s testimony linking the race of defendants to future dangerousness. One of those cases was Mr. Buck’s. The Attorney General acknowledged that reliance on testimony connecting race to dangerousness was wholly unacceptable and promised that the Attorney General’s Office would seek new, fair sentencing hearings for these seven men, including Mr. Buck.

Each of the individuals identified by the Attorney General as deserving a new sentencing hearing has now received one — except for Duane Buck.

The petition filed today by Mr. Buck challenges his death sentence as “an unconstitutional product of racial discrimination” and asks the court to grant him a new, fair sentencing hearing that is free from racially-biased testimony.

Read a press release issued today  on behalf of Mr. Buck’s attorneys, including Christina Swarns of NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Kathryn Kase of Texas Defender Service, and Kate Black.

Read more about the new study by University of Maryland Professor Ray Paternoster, which finds racial bias in Harris County’s death penalty system.
More information about Mr. Buck’s case can be found at http://www.naacpldf.org/case-issue/duane-buck-sentenced-death-because-he-black.


[1] “You heard from Dr. Quijano, who had a lot of experience in the Texas Department of Corrections, who told you that there was a probability that the man would commit future acts of violence.” Source: State’s Closing Argument, Cause No. 699684, Reporter’s Record, Volume 28, p. 260 (1997).

 

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