The Autobiography of an Execution; new insight into death row through death penalty litigator

The Autobiography of an Execution explores the politics behind the death penalty, while examining personal challenges faced by author and Texas death row attorney David Dow’s laborious career defending death row inmates and the impact such work has on his personal life as a husband and father. Dow criticizes the death penalty in Texas, siting a variety of problems within the criminal justice system from pre-meditated detective work to partial judges intent on upholding death sentences. Additionally, Mr. Dow believes that 7 of the nearly 100 death row inmates he has represented were falsely convicted, a claim which if true, only exasperates further the possibility of wrongful executions in the state.


Although Dow vehemently opposes the death penalty, multiple review sources claim this novel is a must read regardless of ones political stance on capital punishment; “Dow’s candor seems so absolute that readers on both sides of the debate can gain insight into the thought process of an experienced advocate (Christian Science Monitor)”

A review of The Autobiography of an Execution is available here.
NPR also provides an excerpt of the book alongside an interview with the author, available here.

The following is a schedule of Mr. Dow’s book tour:
Tuesday, February 9th – Legacy Books – Plano, TX
Wednesday, February 10th – Borders – Dallas, TX
Thursday, February 11th – Barnes & Noble – Arlington, TX
Monday, February 15th – Brazos Bookstore – Houston, TX
Wednesday, February 17th – Books & Books – Miami, FL
Tuesday, February 23rd – Book People – Austin, TX
Wednesday, February 24th – Barnes & Noble – San Antonio, TX
Saturday, February 27th – Politics & Prose – Washington, DC

David Dow works as the litigation director at the Texas Defender Service while teaching law at the University of Houston Law Center.

One thought on “The Autobiography of an Execution; new insight into death row through death penalty litigator

  1. I heard the NPR interview yesterday and I was fascinated by Dow's description of showering after witnessing an execution. Ironically, you often hear very similar accounts of wanting to shower from wardens and guards who participate in carrying out executions.

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