U.S. Supreme Court invalidates Texas’s standards on intellectual disabilities in death penalty cases

Today, March 28, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the state of Texas must use current medical standards for determining whether a person is intellectually disabled and therefore exempt from execution.  The case – Moore v. Texas – involves Bobby James Moore, who was convicted of killing a grocery story employee during a bungled robbery […]

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U.S. Supreme Court set to hear Moore v. Texas

On Tuesday, November 29, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court will hold oral argument in Moore v. Texas, a case that addresses Texas’s unscientific standard for determining whether a person is intellectually disabled and therefore exempt from execution. Moore v. Texas asks the Court to decide if it is unconstitutional for Texas “to prohibit the use […]

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U.S. Supreme Court agrees to hear Texas death penalty case involving intellectual disabilities

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear two Texas death penalty cases: one involving egregious racial bias (Buck v. Stephens) and the other addressing our state’s unscientific and outdated process for assessing intellectual disabilities in capital cases (Moore v. Texas). The case of Bobby James Moore raises the question of whether modern standards should be used in determining whether he is intellectually disabled and therefore ineligible for the death penalty.

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State of Texas Executes Robert Ladd

Tonight, the State of Texas carried out its second execution of the year, putting Robert Ladd to death for the 1996 murder of Vicki Ann Garner in Tyler (Smith County).  Late this afternoon the U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal that evidence of Ladd’s intellectual disabilities should bar his execution, in accordance with the Court’s own ruling in […]

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